What Is MRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MRI, the abbreviation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, is one of technology’s most advanced diagnostic tools for today’s physician. It allows your physician to see inside your body without the need for surgery or the use of radiation. MRI uses a powerful magnet, low intensity radio waves and computer technology to create detailed images of the soft tissues, muscles, and bones in your body.

 

For an MRI test, you are placed sideways in the magnet. Pictures from an MRI scan are digital images that can be saved and stored on a computer for more study. In some cases, contrast material may be used during the MRI scan to show certain structures more clearly.

 

Why It Is Done

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is done for many reasons. It is used to find problems such as tumors, bleeding, injury, blood vessel diseases, or infection. MRI also may be done to provide more information about a problem seen on an X-ray, ultrasound scan, or CT scan.

 

Risks

There are no known harmful effects from the magnetic field strengths generated by our MRI equipment. 

 

It should be noted that the magnet is  powerful and may affect certain pacemakers, artificial limbs, and other medical devices. Be sure to tell your health professional if you have any of these.

 

While the risk of  an allergic reaction is slight, if contrast material is used during the MRI, be sure to tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease; are over 65 years of age; have a history of diabetes or hypertension.

 

 

© Maryland MRI LLC 2013 dba: Maryland Open MRI

 

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